The Center for Cellular Biointerfaces in Science and Engineering (CCBSE) is co-led by NDSU University Distinguished Professor Kalpana S. Katti, Ph.D., F. AIMBE and UND Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Associate Dean for Research Mark Hoffmann. The CCBSE has three pillars of scientific inquiry: materials design at biointerfaces; cellular systems at materials interface; and computation, machine learning, and predictive modeling.

The CCBSE is supported by ND-ACES: New Discoveries in the Advanced Interface of Computation, Engineering, and Science, ND EPSCoR’s most recent NSF cooperative agreement (award number 1946202), and is a five-year cooperative agreement that carries an 80/20% federal/state match.

The ND-ACES Principal Investigator (PI) and Project Director (PD) is Kelly A. Rusch, Ph.D., P.E., BCEE; NDSU. The Co-PIs are John Mihelich, Ph.D.; UND, and Jean Ostrom-Blonigen, Ph.D., CPA; ND EPSCoR.


Center for Cellular Biointerfaces in Science and Engineering Leadership

Mark Hoffmann

Mark Hoffmann is a UND Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Associate Dean for Research, University of North Dakota. Contact Mark Hoffmann.

Kalpana S. Katti


Kalpana Katti is a University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering and the Graduate Program Coordinator at North Dakota State University. Contact Kalpana S. Katti

Publications

View a complete list of student and faculty publications here. Publications can also be found in the NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR)

Researcher Spotlight

Name: Michael Kjelland
Hometown: Valley City
Institution & Department: Mayville State University, Dept. of Science, Math & Agribusiness
Pillar: Materials

What are you researching?
The project is titled, “3D Bioprinting Using Porcine Collagen Matrix Scaffolding for 3D Pancreatic Cancer and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Culture, Treatment/Differentiation, and Cryopreservation.” We are using both 2D and 3D in vitro cell culture environments. Two separate cell types are being tested, i.e., 1) human mesenchymal stem cells (sourced from RoosterBio, Inc) are being differentiated into osteocytes and 2) human pancreatic cancer cells including treatment with a wheat bran derived phytochemical, i.e., ferulic acid, for testing the potential effects on cell viability and proliferation.

Why is it important?
3D bioprinting is now being utilized in several areas of biomedicine, both for research and treatment. The present research proposal involves increasing the efficiency of cancer cell and stem cell cultures using the specially designed hypoxia chamber, i.e., Petakas, combined with the 3D printed in vivo mimicking tissue environment, as opposed to more traditional 2D in vitro cell culturing. Such a model may elucidate how tumor cell populations adapt to that environment with O2 consumption reduction and compromised cancer treatment penetration effects. This combination of methods stands to offer an in vitro model of tumor dormancy and recurrence more realistic of in vivo conditions.

Student Spotlight

Name: Lauren Prowse 
Hometown: Paso Robles, California 
Institution & Department: University of North Dakota, Chemistry
Pillar: Materials Design at Biointerfaces

What are you researching? Our research currently focuses on developing diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for different biomedical purposes. While also creating polymer-based nanomaterials that are both biodegradable and biocompatible with predesigned functions. Then employ them to fabricate smart nanosystems loaded with various agents for treating different human diseases, which include cancer and neurological disorders.  

Why is it important? This research will allow the use of smart nanosystems on polymers to carry diagnostic or therapeutic agents to targeted cells and tissues in the body to achieve desired outcomes. Current effort is to produce polymers that degrade into smaller molecules once in the body to decrease buildup and toxicity. These polymers also are biocompatible, in order to decrease a negative response to living tissue.

News

  • Congratulations to ND-ACES Materials Design Pillar UND Lead, Julia Xiaojun Zhao, on receiving UND’s highest academic honor, the Chester Fritz Distinguished Professorship.
  • Congratulation to student researcher Di Sun from UND who received a Graduate Student Oral Presentation award at the North Dakota Academy of Science Annual Conference in Fargo!
  • Congratulations to student researcher Omolola Eniodunmo on receiving a graduate student council research symposium award at NDSU Student Research Day!
  • Congratulations to student researcher Sarah Reagen on recieving UND's Excellence in Teaching Award for 2022.
  • Congratulations to student reseracher Yingfen Wu on first place in Natural Sciences at the UND Graduate Research Achievement Day for her presentation: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Synergistic Photodynamic /Photothermal Therapy!
  • Congratulations to CCBSE researchers, Dr. Trung Bao Le and Dr. Kerry Hartman, co-PIs on a recently awarded NSF EPSCoR Track-2 cooperative agreement that will create an artificial intelligence research center focused on sustainable energy. Congratulations Dr. Hartman and Dr. Le!
  • The Secondary Student Careers in STEM Panel Science Café was Wednesday, March 30. Science Cafés are open to everyone and are an opportunity for scientists and the public to discuss current work and interesting scientific issues. Learn more on the ND-ACES Science Café Series page.
  • The 2022 ND EPSCoR Annual State Conference was Wednesday, April 6, 2022. See our conference information page.
  • Deniz Cakir, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astrophysics at UND and ND-ACES Computational Approaches Pillar researcher, is awarded a $600,000 DoD Defense Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (DEPSCoR) grant.
  • Sanku Mallik, Professor and NDSU ND-ACES Materials Design Lead on receives the Teacher of the Year Award in the NDSU School of Pharmacy.
  • Cellular Systems at Biointerfaces undergraduate student researcher Carson Herbert (UND; advisor: Archana Dhasarathy) recieves a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship, an 8 week program for undergraduate students from underrepresented groups in the Biomedical Sciences from the University of California, San Diego.
  • Jingyan Fu (NDSU), ND-ACES Cyberinfrastructure (CI) Assistant, presented at a meeting of Women in High Performance Computing (WHPC) on April 28, 2021.

 

 

 

Student participant future endeavors

Congratulations to our student participants who are graduating and embarking on their next endeavor!

  • Krishna Kundu (NDSU) successfully defended his research and has started a job at ThermoFisher in San Diego, California as a Scientist.
  • Kincaid Rowbotham (UND) will be a Ph.D. student Dr. Xusheng Wang's lab after graduation.
  • Sarah Reagen (UND) graduated Aug 5 and has a job in South Dakota
  • Carson Herbert (UND) is now attending medical school.

Materials Design at Biointerfaces Pillar

The Materials Design at Biointerfaces Pillar objective is to progressively increase CCBSE researcher knowledge and application in the area of biomaterial scaffolds relevant to tissue engineering, particularly in the area of design methodologies of biologically inspired materials for diverse 3D tissue architectures. This pillar is co-led by Sanku Mallik (NDSU) and Julia Xiaojun Zhao (UND).

 

 

Cellular Systems at Materials Interface Pillar

The Cellular Systems at Materials Interface Pillar objective is to increase the capacity and expertise of the CCBSE researchers in basic and translational use of in vivo-like 3D cell cultures, which will ultimately (long-term outcome) allow the team to partner with regional health care providers to serve as a resource for personalized medicine approaches to cancer. This pillar is co-led by Archana Dhasarathy (UND) and John C. Wilkinson (NDSU).

 

Computation, Machine Learning, and Predictive Modeling Pillar

The Computation, Machine Learning, and Predictive Modeling Pillar objective is to enhance connected learning, knowledge, and application across multi-scale modeling, machine learning platforms, and experimental biomaterials and cellular data, which will result in an evolutionary in-silico platform to predict tumor growth. Increased knowledge and understanding of 3D systems can lead to future therapeutic/mitigation alternatives. This pillar is co-led by Dinesh R. Katti (NDSU) and Deniz Cakir (UND).

Explain it to me - What is deep learning?

Sanku Mallik

Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, North Dakota State University. Contact Sanku Mallik.

 

Archana Dhasarathy

Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Dakota. Contact Archana Dhasarathy.

 

Dinesh R. Katti

Jordan A. Enberg Presidential Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, North Dakota State University. Contact Dinesh R. Katti.

Julia Xiaojun Zhao

UND Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, University of North Dakota. Contact Julia Xiaojun Zhao.

John C. Wilkinson

Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, North Dakota State University. Contact John C. Wilkinson.

Deniz Cakir

Associate Professor of Physics & Astrophysics, University of North Dakota. Contact Deniz Cakir.

CCBSE Members

Austin Allard

Pre-Engineering Instructor, Turtle Mountain Community College. Contact Austin Allard.

Aaron Bergstrom

Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Manager, University of North Dakota. Contact Aaron Bergstrom.

Mikhail Bobylev

Professor of Chemistry, Minot State University. Contact Mikhail Bobylev.

Colin K. Combs


Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of North Dakota. Contact Colin K. Combs

Yen Lee Loh

Associate Professor of Physics & Astrophysics, University of North Dakota. Contact Yen Lee Loh.

Guodong Du

Professor of Chemistry, University of North Dakota. Contact Guodong Du.

Marcus Fries

Chair, Department of Mathematics & Computer Science & Associate Professor of Mathematics, Dickinson State University. Contact Marcus Fries.

Nicholas Galt

Assistant Professor of Science, Valley City State University. Contact Nicholas Galt.

Amanda Haage

Assistant Professor of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Dakota. Contact Amanda Haage.

Kerry Hartman

Academic Dean and Environmental Science Chair, Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College. Contact Kerry Hartman.

Khang Hoang

Center for Computationally Assisted Science and Technology (CCAST) Research Scientist, North Dakota State University. Contact Khang Hoang.

Khwaja Hossain

Professor of Biology, Mayville State University. Contact Khwaja Hossain.

Svetlana Kilina

James A. Meier Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, North Dakota State University. Contact Svetlana Kilina.

Jiha Kim

Assistant Professor of Biology, North Dakota State University. Contact Jiha Kim.

Michael Kjelland

Assistant Professor of Biology, Mayville State University. Contact Michael Kjelland

Trung Bao Le

Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, North Dakota State University. Contact Trung Bao Le.

Lu Liu

Assistant Professor of Computer Science, North Dakota State University. Contact Lu Liu.

Mike Parker

Professor of Pre-Engineering and Mathematics, Cankdeska Cikana Community College. Contact Mike Parker.

Mohiuddin Quadir

Associate Professor of Coatings and Polymeric Materials, North Dakota State University. Contact Mohiuddin Quadir.

Prakash Selvakumar

Assistant Professor, Department of Civil, Construction & Environmental Engineering, North Dakota State University

Binglin Sui

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, University of North Dakota. Contact Binglin Sui.

Hilde van Gijssel

Professor of Science, Valley City State University. Contact Hilde van Gijssel.

Brent Voels

Professor of Science, Cankdeska Cikana Community College. Contact Brent Voels.

Wenjie Xia

Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, North Dakota State University. Contact Wenjie Xia.

Ravi Kiran Yellavajjala

Assistant Professor, Civil, Construction and Environment Engineering, North Dakota State University. Contact Ravi Kiran Yellavajjala

Integration with PROSPER (PROmoting Sustainable Partnerships in Education and Research)

PROSPER, the broadening participation arm of ND-ACES, provides education and experiences designed to build a diverse workforce, enhance partnerships and collaborations with various stakeholders, and inform North Dakota’s residents. The four elements of PROSPER are: Education and Workforce Development, Broadening Participation, Partnerships and Collaborations, and Comunication and Dissemination.

The goals of the CCBSE research efforts/intellectual merit are enhanced via the simultaneous and linked broader impact efforts of the PROSPER team and will be achieved through the establishment of diverse and sustainable STEM education and professional development pathways and expanded bioscience partnerships and internships designed to enhance success in future federal funding and support the transformation of research into practical use via trained personnel and new products. PROSPER will also expand underserved and underrepresented participation, and inform the residents of North Dakota.

Broadening Participation

Broadening Participation supports American Indian students and other underserved groups along the biosciences pathway. The STEM content conveyed in the activities of this element correlate to the CCBSE research areas and align with this team’s objective to increase the participation of underrepresented and underserved groups in STEM across a variety of age groups from elementary school to Ph.D. faculty.

Education and Workforce Development

Education and Workforce Development Element strengthens ND’s bioscience/STEM ecosystem by building a diverse pool of competitive researchers, skilled workers, effective educators, and engaged students. Working in close conjunction with the CCBSE, this element supports faculty professional development, student training, and K-12 student bioscience, engineering, and computational exposure.

Partnerships and Collaborations

The Partnerships and Collaborations team builds research infrastructure and strengthens ND’s research competitiveness through industry partnerships and other collaborations. The team works with CCBSE researchers and industry relations personnel to collaborate on research partnerships using established research protocols.

Communication and Dissemination

The Communcation and Dissemination team is working toward the goal of developing an elevated public understanding of the economic impact of growing North Dakota’s bioscience sector through strategic research investments as a result of data-sharing, communication, and outreach. Communication and Dissemintaion integrates with CCBSE researcher and PROSPER teams to create engaging content for public dissemination.


Acknowledgment

The ND-ACES NSF Track-1 cooperative agreement is a federal-state partnership to manage a comprehensive research development plan. ND EPSCoR manages the Track-1 award. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. Current funding is provided by the State of North Dakota and NSF EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Improvement Program Track-1 (RII Track-1) Cooperative Agreement Award OIA #1946202. The ND-ACES Principal Investigator (PI) and Project Director (PD) is Kelly A. Rusch, Ph.D., P.E., BCEE; NDSU. The Co-PIs are John Mihelich, Ph.D.; UND, and Jean Ostrom-Blonigen, Ph.D., CPA; ND EPSCoR.